These stunning photos are on display at the Seattle Aquarium in a new exhibit, featuring the work of scientist & artist Adam Summers. The fish’s tissues have been stained with dye, a technique that is often used in the lab. But when perfected, it can also create gorgeous art.

One thing that makes fish particularly beautiful when dyed this way is that they are very complex—in some ways, more so than people:

For instance, fish have a lot more bones than, say, mammals. A person has over 200 bones in all, while there are 200 bones just in a fish’s head and the start of its vertebral column, Summers says. “That level of sort of repetitiveness draws the eye. It’s kinda cool.”

See more photos at National Geographic.

scienceyoucanlove:

Helmet Jelly - Periphylla periphylla

The umbrella is usually higher than wide. It may reach a height of 35 cm and a diameter of 25cm. The tip is pointed or dome-shaped. The large, red or orange stomach occupies the upper part of the umbrella. The 12 thick, orange tentacles can be more than 50 cm long. There is no information about a polypoid stage.

Habitat:

This is a common deep sea species. At locations dominated by strong tidal currents, forcing water from 200 metres or more up towards the surface, they can be encountered at any depth. At some locations this phenomenon is highly seasonal. An example is Lurefjorden (Hordaland) where water from 200 metres depth is forced into the fjord through a shallow (20 metres) and narrow (200 metres) sill entrance. In april every year, a large number of helmet jellies comes with the tide. At at other locations, like Skarnsundet, in the Trondheim Fjord, you may find them at any time of the year. Here the entrance is more than 200 metres deep and much wider than in Lurefjorden, so most of the helmet jellies pass below the common scuba diver. The maximum recorded depth is 2700 metres.

Distribution:

The helmet jelly is a cosmopolitan and widespread in the Atlantic Ocean, except in the Arctic. The Trondheim Fjord seems to be north of the “official” distribution area, but the helmet jelly does not know that.

source

The phenomenon where we don’t notice that fish stocks are shrinking because we get used to smaller catches is called shifting baselines.
scientificillustration:

skunkbear:

Bathing suits are not the only things that have gotten smaller in the past fifty years.
All these photos were taken on the same dock after fishing trips in the same waters. The last one was taken by post-doc Loren McClenachan, the rest were compiled by her from the records at Key West’s Monroe County Public Library.
Using the display boards as a size reference (they haven’t changed in half a century), McClenachan was able to accurately plot the shrinking size of the fish.
Read more about big fish stories getting littler — from Robert Krulwich — here.

The big fish are very important as they are their offspring survive better than those of younger fish - killing large old fish is a disaster for the long term survival of species.
Steven A. Berkeley, Colin Chapman, and Susan M. Sogard 2004. MATERNAL AGE AS A DETERMINANT OF LARVAL GROWTH AND SURVIVAL IN A MARINE FISH, SEBASTES MELANOPS. Ecology 85:1258–1264. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/03-0706
Life history change in commercially exploited fish stocks: an analysis of trends across studies. Diana M. T. Sharpe1, Andrew P. Hendry
DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-4571.2009.00080.x
Zoom Info
The phenomenon where we don’t notice that fish stocks are shrinking because we get used to smaller catches is called shifting baselines.
scientificillustration:

skunkbear:

Bathing suits are not the only things that have gotten smaller in the past fifty years.
All these photos were taken on the same dock after fishing trips in the same waters. The last one was taken by post-doc Loren McClenachan, the rest were compiled by her from the records at Key West’s Monroe County Public Library.
Using the display boards as a size reference (they haven’t changed in half a century), McClenachan was able to accurately plot the shrinking size of the fish.
Read more about big fish stories getting littler — from Robert Krulwich — here.

The big fish are very important as they are their offspring survive better than those of younger fish - killing large old fish is a disaster for the long term survival of species.
Steven A. Berkeley, Colin Chapman, and Susan M. Sogard 2004. MATERNAL AGE AS A DETERMINANT OF LARVAL GROWTH AND SURVIVAL IN A MARINE FISH, SEBASTES MELANOPS. Ecology 85:1258–1264. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/03-0706
Life history change in commercially exploited fish stocks: an analysis of trends across studies. Diana M. T. Sharpe1, Andrew P. Hendry
DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-4571.2009.00080.x
Zoom Info

The phenomenon where we don’t notice that fish stocks are shrinking because we get used to smaller catches is called shifting baselines.

scientificillustration:

skunkbear:

Bathing suits are not the only things that have gotten smaller in the past fifty years.

All these photos were taken on the same dock after fishing trips in the same waters. The last one was taken by post-doc Loren McClenachan, the rest were compiled by her from the records at Key West’s Monroe County Public Library.

Using the display boards as a size reference (they haven’t changed in half a century), McClenachan was able to accurately plot the shrinking size of the fish.

Read more about big fish stories getting littler — from Robert Krulwich — here.

The big fish are very important as they are their offspring survive better than those of younger fish - killing large old fish is a disaster for the long term survival of species.

Steven A. Berkeley, Colin Chapman, and Susan M. Sogard 2004. MATERNAL AGE AS A DETERMINANT OF LARVAL GROWTH AND SURVIVAL IN A MARINE FISH, SEBASTES MELANOPS. Ecology 85:1258–1264. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/03-0706

Life history change in commercially exploited fish stocks: an analysis of trends across studies. Diana M. T. Sharpe1, Andrew P. Hendry

DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-4571.2009.00080.x

Can you run 150 feet (46 meters) in a day? It doesn’t seem that fast—but it’s a breakneck pace if you’re a glacier. One Greenland glacier named Jakobshavn Isbrae has just broken speed record and is racing into the sea faster than any glacier we know:

"We are now seeing summer speeds more than four times what they were in the 1990s on a glacier which at that time was believed to be one of the fastest, if not the fastest, glaciers in Greenland," Ian Joughin, a researcher at the University of Washington in Seattle, told the BBC.

Previous studies found that this glacier alone contributes to around 4% of global sea level rise.

Photo: Paul Souders, Corbis

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Much like the wind map we featured previously, designer Cameron Beccario’s visualizations of wind and ocean surface current data draw from near-real-time sources to create a stunning picture of fluid dynamics on a planetary scale. The number of options in terms of projections and data are really quite incredible, and you’ll want to play around to get a real sense for it. Want to see the wind and total precipitable water at 1000 hPa? Here you go. Maybe you prefer studying Pacific ocean currents. All the data are there to play with. People often wonder why weather forecasts aren’t always right, but, when you look at the scale and complexity of these flows, it’s almost a wonder that we can predict them at all. (Image credits:C. Beccario/earth; via skunkbear and io9)

A new coral species, Psammogorgia hookeri, has been collected by scuba divers from rocky ledges at depths to 25 meters in Peru’s Paracas National Reserve:

“This new species may be found nowhere else in the world,” said Hector Guzman, marine biologist at STRI. “But coral reefs and coral communities in Peru have never been systematically studied. We expect more surprises as we look at new collections.”

Read more.

Diving in the middle of nowhere can show you some amazing sights of near-pristine coral reefs. But it can also be dangerous to dive so far from a hospital in case of injury. How do you prepare?

Scripps Institution of Oceanography Scientific Diving Safety Officer Christian McDonald shares about how makes sure no divers go missing, while enjoying a fun dive at the Ocean Portal blog. 

Photo: Mark Vermeij

What an amazing image of the lifecycle of a jellyfish! Learn more about jellyfish lifecycle at the Ocean Portal.

deepseanews:

A polyp slowly changes it’s body into a jellyfish-making machine. Image courtesy of Konstantin Khalturin. Researchers have announced that, thanks to a whole slew of amazing science gadgets, they can now control the jellyfish life cycle, causing mini-jellyfish blooms in the lab anytime t…

http://deepseanews.com/2014/02/scientists-use-electricity-drugs-to-uncover-the-secret-world-of-jellyfish/

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union